Nov 10 – Leo the Great

Nov 10 - Leo the Great

Leo the Great
Bishop of Rome + Doctor of the Church
10 November 461

click here for books by or abouut Leo the Great


From the Satucket Lectionary

Portrait of Leo the GreatLeo I (440-461) and Gregory I (590-604) are the only two bishops of Rome commonly called “the Great.” Leo, at a time when the capital of the Empire had been moved to Constantinople, and the government even in Italy no longer had its headquarters at Rome, was the most important official in the city. To him fell such prosaic tasks as supervising the distribution of grain imports and reorganizing the municipal fire department. When Attila and the Huns invaded Italy in 452, he negotiated their withdrawal, and when Gaiseric (or Genseric) the Vandal captured Rome three years later, it was Leo who prevented the total destruction of the city. It is perhaps not surprising that the theory of papal supremacy gained much ground in his day.

In his day there were disgreements about the correct way to state the truth that Jesus Christ is both God and man. In 449 Leo wrote a letter (known as the Tome of Leo) to Bishop Flavian of Constantinople, in which he affirmed that Christ has two Natures in one Person. The letter was read in 451 by the Council of Chalcedon (the fourth Ecumenical Council), and judged by them to be sound doctrine. It contributed much to the creedal statements of that council.

Leo’s influence on church government will naturally get mixed reviews. But for his defense of the belief that God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, all Christians may thank God.

From a sermon by Leo the Great:

Although the universal Church of God is constituted of distinct orders of members, still, in spite of the many parts of its holy body, the Church subsists as an integral whole, just as the Apostle says: we are all one in Christ. . .For all, regenerated in Christ, are made kings by the sign of the cross; they are consecrated priests by the oil of the Holy Spirit, so that beyond the special service of our ministry as priests, all spiritual and mature Christians know that they are a royal race and are sharers in the office of the priesthood. For what is more king-like that to find yourself ruler over your body after having surrendered your soul to God? And what is more priestly than to promise the Lord a pure conscience and to offer him in love unblemished victims on the altar of one’s heart?

by James Kiefer

 

Nov 7 – Willibrord of Utrecht

Willibrord of Utrecht

Willibrord of Utrecht
Archbishop + Missionary
7 November 729

click here for books about Willibrord of Utrecht


 

Stamp honoring Willibrord on the 1200th anniversary of his deathWillibrord, first Archbishop of Utrecht, is one of the missionaries sent out by the Anglo-Saxon Christians about a century after they had themselves been Christianized by missionaries in the south and east of England from Rome and the Continent, and in the north and west from the Celtic peoples of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales.

Our information about Willibrord comes to us from the Venerable Bede (History of the English Church and People, v. 10-11) and from a biography by his younger kinsman Alcuin (see 20 May), Minister of Education under the Emperor Charlemagne. Willibrord was born in Northumbria in England about 658, and studied in France and Ireland. In 690 he set out with 12 companions to preach to the pagans of Frisia (a region roughly coextensive with the province of Friesland in the Netherlands, including some adjacent territories and the Frisian islands in the North Sea). His work was interrupted several times by wars, and he left for a while to preach to the Danes instead. He died 7 November 739.

Willibrord is a symbol of ties between the Christians of England and those of Holland. Today the historic See of Utrecht is in full communion with the Church of England.

 

by James Kiefer

Stamp honoring Willibrord on the 1200th anniversary of his deathStamp honoring Willibrord on the 1300th anniversary of his birth

(These stamps honor Willibrord because of his founding of the Abbey at Echternach, in Luxemburg, and were used to aid renovations there.)

Nov 6 – William Temple

Nov 6 - William Temple

William Temple
Archbishop of Canterbury
6 November 1944

click here for books by or about William Temple


 

From the Satucket Lectionary

William TempleTemple’s admirers have called him “a philosopher, theologian, social teacher, educational reformer, and the leader of the ecumenical movement of his generation,” “the most significant Anglican churchman of the twentieth century,” “the most renowned Primate in the Church of England since the English Reformation,” “Anglican’s most creative and comprehensive contribution to the theological enterprise of the West.” One of his biographers lists him (along with Richard HookerJoseph Butler, and Frederick Denison Maurice) as one of the Four Great Doctors of the (post-Reformation) Anglican Communion.

Ronald Knox, in a satiric poem, described him thus:

A man so broad, to some he seem’d to be
Not one, but all Mankind in Effigy.
Who, brisk in Term, a Whirlwind in the Long,
Did everything by turns, and nothing wrong.
Bill’d at each Lecture-Hall from Thames to Tyne,
As Thinker, Usher, Statesman, or Divine.

George Bernard Shaw called him, “a realized impossibility.”

Who was this remarkable person?

William Temple, 98th Archbishop of Canterbury, was born in 1881, the second son of Frederick Temple (born 1821, priest 1847, headmaster of Rugby 1857, Bishop of Exeter 1869, Bishop of London 1884, Archbishop of Canterbury 1897, died 1902). At the age of two, he had the first attack of the gout that would be with him throughout life and eventually kill him. His eyesight was bad, and a cataract, present from infancy, left him completely blind in the right eye when he was 40. However, he was an avid reader, with a near-photographic memory, and once he had read a book, it was his. He was a passionate lover of the music of Bach. In literature, his special enthusiasms were poetry (Browning and Shelley), drama (the Greeks and Shakespeare), and a few novels, especially The Brothers Karamazov. He believed that theological ideas were often explored most effectively by writers who were not explicitly writing theology.

He was at Oxford (Balliol) from 1900 to 1904, and was president of the Oxford Union (the debating society of the University). Here he developed a remarkable ability to sum up an issue, expressing the pros and cons so clearly and fairly that the original opponents often ended up agreeing with each other. This ability served him in good stead later when he moderated conferences on theological and social issues. However, it was not just a useful talent for settling disputes. It was, or developed into, an important part of his philosophy, a belief in Dialectic, derived from Hegel and from Plato. He thought that beliefs and ideas reach their full maturity through their response to opposing ideas.

In 1906, he applied for ordination, but the Bishop of Oxford would not ordain him because he admitted that his belief in the Virgin Birth and the Bodily Resurrection of Jesus was shaky. However, Davidson, the Archbishop of Canterbury, after a careful examination, decided that Temple’s thought was developing in a direction that would inevitably bring him into an orthodox position, and decided to take a chance on ordaining him (deacon 1909, priest 1910). He may be said to have won his bet, in that by 1913 Temple had indeed committed himself fully to the orthodox position, and could write: “I believe in the Virgin Birth…it wonderfully holds before the imagination the truth of Our Lord’s Deity and so I am glad that it is in the Creed. Similarly I believe in our Lord’s Bodily Resurrection.”

In 1908 he became president of the Workers’ Educational Association (founded by Frederick Denison Maurice), and in 1918 joined the British Labour Party, and worked actively for the implementing of its platform. He also became vigorously involved in movements for Christian co-operation and unity, in missions, in the British Council of Churches, in the World Council of Churches, in the Church of South India (a merger of Anglican, Congregationalist, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches into a single church, with provisions for safeguarding what each group thought essential).

In 1916 he married Frances Anson, and the night before the wedding he stayed up late to finish writing his first major theological treatise, Mens Creatrix (the Creative Mind). Eight years later he published a companion volume, expanding and clarifying the ideas of the first, called Christus Veritas (Christ the Truth). In 1921 he was made Bishop of Manchester, a heavily industrial city. In 1926 Britain experienced what was known as the General Strike, in which most workmen in all trades and industries went on strike, not against their particular employers, but against the social and economic policies of the country as a whole. In Manchester this meant primarily a coal stoppage. Temple worked extensively to mediate between the parties, and helped to bring about a settlement that both sides regarded as basically fair.

He excelled, it would seem, not as a scholar, but as a moderator, and above all as a teacher and preacher. In 1931, at the end of the Oxford Mission (what is known in many Protestant circles as a Revival Meeting), he led a congregation in the University Church, St Mary the Virgin, in the singing of the hymn, “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross.” Just before the last stanza, he stopped them and asked them to read the words to themselves. “Now,” he said, if you mean them with all your heart, sing them as loud as you can. If you don’t mean them at all, keep silent. If you mean them even a little and want to mean them more, sing them very softly.” The organ played, and two thousand voices whispered:

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were an offering far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all.

For many who participated, it was a never-forgotten experience.

Temple became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1942, when a German invasion seemed likely. He worked for the relief of Jewish refugees from Naziism, and publicly supported a negotiated peace, as opposed to the unconditional surrender that the Allied leaders were demanding.

His gout worsened. His last public appearance was at a clergy retreat (a time spent in a secluded place, with silence, prayer, meditation, reading, and listening to sermons), where he was taken by ambulance and spoke standing on his one good foot. He died on 26 October 1944.

The current issue of Books in Print (American) shows the following works available by him. (Stars mark what one biographer calls his three most important books.)

Readings in St. John’s Gospel, 1985, Morehouse Pub, 391 pp, paper, LC 84-62374, ISBN 0-8192-1360-8 (a bargain! Highly recommended) [currently out of print but should be avilable used]

Hope of a New World, ISBN 0-8369-1778-2 [currently out of print but should be avilable used]

Christian Faith and Life, Morehouse, 150pp, pap, ISBN 0-8192-1631-3 (originally delivered as the Oxford Mission addresses, first published in 1931 from shorthand notes of the addresses) [currently out of print but should be avilable used]

Nature, Man, and God (the Gifford Lectures 1932-33). Ams Press. (The Gifford Lectures are an endowed annual series of lectures on Natural Theology–that is, the lecturer is to take his evidence from the observed facts of nature and not ask his listeners to accept the genuineness of any particular revelation to Moses or David or Mohammed or…. The series is prestigious. William James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience and Edwyn Bevan’sSymbolism and Belief were both originally Gifford’s Lectures.) [currently out of print but should be avilable used]

Works in 4 Volumes.

Other works of his, not listed as being in print, but presumably included in the Works mentioned above (although the title does not explicitly say Complete Works), include the following:

Christus Veritas: An Essay, London, Macmillan, 1924. [currently out of print but should be available used]

Mens Creatrix: An Essay, London, Macmillan, 1935.

Christianity and the Social Order, New York, Penguin Books, 1942.

by James Kiefer

[Clicking on one of the links above will take you to Amazon.com, where you may buy the book if you wish.]

Nov 3 – Richard Hooker

Illumination - Richard Hooker

Richard Hooker
Priest + Theologian
3 November 1600

click here for books by or about Richard Hooker


From the Satucket Lectionary

Portrait of Richard HookerOn any list of great English theologians, the name of Richard Hooker would appear at or near the top. His masterpiece is The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity. Its philosophical base is Aristotelian, with a strong emphasis on natural law eternally planted by God in creation. On this foundation, all positive laws of Church and State are developed from Scriptural revelation, ancient tradition, reason, and experience.
The occasion of his writing was the demand of English Puritans for a reformation of Church government. Calvin had established in Geneva a system whereby each congregation was ruled by a commission comprising two thirds laymen elected annually by the congregation and one third clergy serving for life. The English Puritans (by arguments more curious than convincing) held that no church not so governed could claim to be Christian.
Hooker replies to this assertion, but in the process he raises and considers fundamental questions about the authority and legitimacy of government (religious and secular), about the nature of law, and about various kinds of law, including the laws of physics as well as the laws of England. In the course of his book he sets forth the Anglican view of the Church, and the Anglican approach to the discovery of religious truth (the so-called via media, or middle road), and explains how this differs from the position of the Puritans, on the one hand, and the adherents of the Pope, on the other. He is very heavy reading, but well worth it. (He says, on the first page of Chapter I: “Those unto whom we shall seem tedious are in no wise injuried by us, seeing that it lies in their own hands to spare themselves the labor they are unwilling to endure.” This translates into modern English as: “If you can’t take the intellectual heat, get out of the kitchen. If you can’t stand a book that makes you think, go read the funny papers.”) The effect of the book has been considerable. Hooker greatly influenced John Locke, and (both directly and through Locke), American political philosophy in the late 1700′s. Although Hooker is unsparing in his censure of what he believes to be the errors of Rome, his contemporary, Pope Clement VIII (died 1605), said of the book: “It has in it such seeds of eternity that it will abide until the last fire shall consume all learning.”

Hooker’s best short work is his sermon, “A Learned discourse of Justification.” In an earlier sermon, Hooker had expressed the hope of seeing in Heaven many who had been Romanists on earth. A Puritan preacher took him to task for this, saying that since the Romanists did not believe the doctrine of Justification by Faith, they could not be justified. Hooker replied at length in this sermon, in which (1) he sets forth the Doctrine of Justification by Faith, and agrees with his opponent that the official theology of Rome is defective on this point; (2) he defends his assertion that those who do not rightly understand the means that God has provided for our salvation may nonetheless be saved by it, in which connection he says (I quote from memory): “God is no captious sophister, eager to trip us up whenever we say amiss, but a courteous tutor, ready to amend what, in our weakness or our ignorance, we say ill, and to make the most of what we say aright.” His sermon is often bound with the Laws, and is also available in the paperback volume Faith and Works (ed. Philip Edgecumbe Hughes, Morehouse-Barlow, Wilton CN 06897, ISBN 0-8192-1315-2) [Note: this book is out of print but should be available used]

To obtain the complete text of the Preface to his Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, and White’s abridgement of the remainder of the Laws, send the messages
GET POLITY PREFACE
GET POLITY DIGEST1
GET POLITY DIGEST2
GET POLITY DIGEST3
to the following address: listserv@asuvm.inre.asu.edu

For a list of other materials available at the same site, send the message GET LIBRARY CATALOG

To obtain the material from the Web, try this address and follow the trail:http://elvis.rowan.edu/~kilroy/CHRISTIA/library/

by James Kiefer

Note: The complete works of Richard Hooker are available in four volumes; clicking on this link will take you to Amazon.com, where you can buy the book(s) if you wish. The original eight volumes are also available online.

 

Nov 2 – All Faithful Departed

Nov 2 - All Faithful Departed

All Faithful Departed
(The Feast of All Souls)
2 November

click here for books on the Feast of All Souls/All Faithful Departed


From the Satucket Lectionary

FOR THE DAY OF ALL SOULS 

(2 NOV)

PRAYERS (traditional language)

FOR ALL THE FAITHFUL DEPARTED

In peace let us pray to the Lord.
gravestone    Almighty God, who hast knit together thine elect in one communion and fellowship, in the mystical body of thy Son Christ our Lord: Grant, we beseech thee, to thy whole Church in paradise and on earth, thy light and thy peace.
Grant that all those who have been baptized into Christ’s death and resurrection may die to sin and rise to newness of life, and that through the grave and gate of death we may pass with him to our joyful resurrection.
Grant to us who are still in our pilgrimage, and who walk as yet by faith, that thy Holy Spirit may lead us in holiness and righteousness all our days.
Grant to thy faithful people pardon and peace, that we may be cleansed from all our sins, and serve thee with a quiet mind.
Grant to all who mourn a sure confidence in thy fatherly care, that, casting all their grief upon thee, they may know the consolation of thy love.
Give courage and faith to those who are bereaved, that they may have strength to meet the days ahead in the comfort of a reasonable and holy hope, in the joyful expectation of eternal life with those they love.
Help us, we pray, in the midst of things we cannot understand, to believe and trust in the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, and the resurrection to life everlasting.
Grant us, with all who have died in the hope of the resurrection, to have our consummation and bliss in thine eternal and everlasting glory, and, with all thy saints, to receive the crown of life which thou dost promise to all who share in the victory of thy Son Jesus Christ; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Father of all, we pray to thee for those we love, but see no longer: Grant them thy peace; let light perpetual shine upon them; and in thy loving wisdom and almighty power, work in them the good purpose of thy perfect will; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, we pray thee to set thy passion, cross, and death, between thy judgement and our souls, now and in the hour of our death. Give mercy and grace to the living, pardon and rest to the dead, to thy holy Church peace and concord, and to us sinners everlasting life and glory; who with the Father and the Holy Spirit livest and reignest, one God, now and ever.

Lord Jesus Christ, who by thy death didst take away the sting of death: Grant to us thy servants so to follow in faith where thou hast led the way, that we may at length fall asleep peacefully in thee, and awake after thy likeness; for thy tender mercies’ sake.

O Almighty God, the God of the spirits of all flesh, who by a voice from heaven didst proclaim, Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord: Multiply, we beseech thee, to those who rest in Jesus the manifold blessings of thy love, that the good work which thou didst begin in them may be made perfect unto the day of Jesus Christ. And of thy mercy, O heavenly Father, grant that we, who now serve thee on earth, may at last, together with them, be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light; for the sake of thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord.
FOR A DEPARTED FRIEND

Gravestone of Henry & Phebe Ann Hillard
Gravestone of my wife’s great-great grandparents; in Mendham, NJ

Into thy hands, O merciful Savior, we commend thy servant N., now departed from the body. Acknowledge, we, humbly beseech thee, O Lord, a sheep of thine own fold, a lamb of thine own flock, a sinner of thine own redeeming. Receive (him/her) into the arms of thy mercy, into the blessed rest of everlasting peace, and into the glorious company of the saints in light.

O God, whose mercies cannot be numbered: Accept our prayers on behalf of thy servant N., and grant (him/her) an entrance into the land of light and joy, in the fellowship of thy saints; through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

Remember thy servant, O Lord, according to the favor which thou bearest unto thy people; and grant that, increasing in knowledge and love of thee, (he/she) may go from strength to strength in the life of perfect service in thy heavenly kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Almighty God, we remember this day before thee thy faithful servant N., and we pray that, having opened to (him/her) the gates of larger life, thou wilt receive (him/her) more and more into thy joyful service, that (he/she) may win with thee and all thy servants everywhere the eternal victory, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Into thy hands, O Lord, we commend thy servant, our dear (brother/sister), as into the hands of a faithful Creator and most merciful Savior, beseeching thee that (he/she) may be precious in thy sight. Wash (him/her), we pray thee, in the blood of that immaculate Lamb that was slain to take away the sins of the world; that, whatsoever defilements (he/she) may have contracted in the midst of this earthly life being purged and done away, (he/she) may be presented pure and without spot before thee; through the merits of Jesus Christ thine only Son our Lord.
FOR THOSE WHO MOURN

Lord, Jesus Christ, the Resurrection and the Life:
Thou didst console Martha and Mary in their distress; draw near to us who mourn, and dry the tears of those who weep.
Thou didst weep at the grave of thy friend Lazarus; comfort us in our sorrow.
Thou didst raise the dead to life; give to our (brother/sister) eternal life.
Thou didst promise paradise to the thief who repented; bring our (brother/sister) to the joys of heaven.
Our (brother/sister) was washed in Baptism and annointed with the Holy Spirit; give (him/her) fellowship with all thy saints.
(He/She) was nourished with thy Body and Blood; grant (him/her) a place at the table in your heavenly kingdom.
Comfort us in our sorrows at the death of our (brother/sister); let our faith be our consolation, and eternal life our hope.

Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of comfort: Deal graciously, we pray, with all who mourn; that, casting all their care upon thee, they may know the consolation of thy love; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Almighty God, look with pity upon the sorrows of thy servants for whom we pray. Remember them, Lord, in mercy; nourish them with patience; comfort them with a sense of thy goodness; lift up thy countenance upon them; and give them peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
PRAYERS (contemporary language)

FOR ALL THE FAITHFUL DEPARTED

In peace let us pray to the Lord.
Almighty God, who have knit together your elect in one communion and fellowship, in the mystical body of your Son Christ our Lord: Grant to your whole Church in paradise and on earth, your light and your peace.
Grant that all those who have been baptized into Christ’s death and resurrection may die to sin and rise to newness of life, and that through the grave and gate of death we may pass with him to our joyful resurrection.
Grant to us who are still in our pilgrimage, and who walk as yet by faith, that your Holy Spirit may lead us in holiness and righteousness all our days.
Grant to your faithful people pardon and peace, that we may be cleansed from all our sins, and serve you with a quiet mind.
Grant to all who mourn a sure confidence in your fatherly care, that, casting all their grief upon you, they may know the consolation of your love.
Give courage and faith to those who are bereaved, that they may have strength to meet the days ahead in the comfort of a reasonable and holy hope, in the joyful expectation of eternal life with those they love.
Help us, in the midst of things we cannot understand, to believe and trust in the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, and the resurrection to life everlasting.
Grant us, with all who have died in the hope of the resurrection, to have our consummation and bliss in your eternal and everlasting glory, and, with all your saints, to receive the crown of life which you promise to all who share in the victory of your Son Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Father of all, we pray to you for those we love, but see no longer: Grant them your peace; let light perpetual shine upon them; and in your loving wisdom and almighty power, work in them the good purpose of your perfect will; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, we pray you to set your passion, cross, and death, between your judgement and our souls, now and in the hour of our death. Give mercy and grace to the living, pardon and rest to the dead, to your holy Church peace and concord, and to us sinners everlasting life and glory; who with the Father and the Holy Spirit livest and reignest, one God, now and ever.

Lord Jesus Christ, who by your death have taken away the sting of death: Grant to us your servants so to follow in faith where you have led the way, that we may at length fall asleep peacefully in you, and awake after your likeness; for your tender mercies’ sake.

O Almighty God, the God of the spirits of all flesh, who by a voice from heaven proclaimed, Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord: Multiply, we pray, to those who rest in Jesus the abundant blessings of your love, that the good work which you have begun in them may be made perfect unto the day of Jesus Christ. And of your mercy, O heavenly Father, grant that we, who now serve you on earth, may at last, together with them, be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light; for the sake of your Son Jesus Christ our Lord.
FOR A DEPARTED FRIEND

Into your hands, O merciful Savior, we commend your servant N., now departed from the body. Acknowledge, we, humbly beseech you, O Lord, a sheep of your own fold, a lamb of your own flock, a sinner of your own redeeming. Receive (him/her) into the arms of your mercy, into the blessed rest of everlasting peace, and into the glorious company of the saints in light.

O God, whose mercies cannot be numbered: Accept our prayers on behalf of your servant N., and grant (him/her) an entrance into the land of light and joy, in the fellowship of your saints; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

Remember your servant, O Lord, according to the favor which you bear to your people; and grant that, increasing in knowledge and love of you, (he/she) may go from strength to strength in the life of perfect service in your heavenly kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Almighty God, we remember before you today your faithful servant N., and we pray that, having opened to (him/her) the gates of larger life, you wilt receive (him/her) more and more into your joyful service, that (he/she) may win with you and all your servants everywhere the eternal victory, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Into your hands, O Lord, we commend your servant, our dear (brother/sister), as into the hands of a faithful Creator and most merciful Savior, beseeching you that (he/she) may be precious in your sight. Wash (him/her), we pray you, in the blood of that immaculate Lamb that was slain to take away the sins of the world; that, with every defilement (he/she) may have contracted in the course of this earthly life purged and done away, (he/she) may be presented pure and wiyout spot before you; through the merits of Jesus Christ your only Son our Lord.
FOR THOSE WHO MOURN

Lord, Jesus Christ, the Resurrection and the Life:
You consoled Martha and Mary in their distress; draw near to us who mourn, and dry the tears of those who weep.
You wept at the grave of Lazarus, your friend; comfort us in our sorrow.
You raised the dead to life; give to our (brother/sister) eternal life.
You promised paradise to the thief who repented; bring our (brother/sister) to the joys of heaven.
Our (brother/sister) was washed in Baptism and annointed with the Holy Spirit; give (him/her) fellowship with all thy saints.
(He/She) was nourished with your Body and Blood; grant (him/her) a place at the table in your heavenly kingdom.
Comfort us in our sorrows at the death of our (brother/sister); let our faith be our consolation, and eternal life our hope.

Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of comfort: Deal graciously, we pray, with all who mourn; that, casting all their care upon you, they may know the consolation of your love; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Almighty God, look with pity upon the sorrows of your servants for whom we pray. Remember them, Lord, in mercy; nourish them with patience; comfort them with a sense of your goodness; lift up your countenance upon them; and give them peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

by James Kiefer

 

Oct 31- Sasaki & Tsen

Oct 31- Sasaki & Tsen

Paul Shinji Sasaki + Philip Lindel Tsen
Bishop of Mid-Japan + Bishop of Honan, China
31 October 1946 + 1954

click here for books on Sasaki & Tsen


 

From the Satucket Lectionary

Bp. Paul Sasaki
Bp. Paul Sasaki

Sasaki, Paul Shinji, Bishop of Tokyo, Japan [1885-1946] and Philip Lendel Tsen Bishop of Honan, China [d. June 6, 1954]. Sasaki was a bishop of Nippon Sei Ko Kai (the Anglican Church in Japan) who endured much persecution for his beliefs. In 1937, Tsen and Sasaki attended the 1937 Synod in Canada where they publicly bore witness to the unity among Asian Christians despite the Sino-Japanese war. Sasaki was tortured and imprisoned by the Japanese government in 1944. Bishop Tsen was raised by American missionaries, but after his priestly ordination became involved with a Canadian mission group. He helped sustain the people of his district during the bitter war with Japan. At the end of WW2, he became the leader of the Chinese Anglican Church. Returning from the 1948 Lambeth meeting, he was placed under house arrest by the Communist government.

- from the description in Holy Women, Holy Men

Oct 29 – James Hannington & Companions

Oct 29 - James Hannington & Companions

James Hannington & Companions
Martyrs of Uganda
29 October 1885

click here for books about James Harrington & Companions


 

From the Satucket Lectionary

James HanningtonAmong the new nations of Africa, Uganda is the most predominantly Christian. Mission work began there in the 1870′s with the favor of King Mutesa, who died in 1884. However, his son and successor, King Mwanga, opposed all foreign presence, including the missions.

James Hannington, born 1847, was sent out from England in 1884 by the Anglican Church as missionary Bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa. As he was travelling toward Uganda, he was apprehended by emissaries of King Mwanga. He and his companions were brutally treated and, a week later, 29 October 1885, most of them were put to death. Hannington’s last words were: “Go tell your master that I have purchased the road to Uganda with my blood.”

The first native martyr was the Roman Catholic Joseph Mkasa Balikuddembe, who was beheaded after having rebuked the king for his debauchery and for the murder of Bishop Hannington. On 3 June 1886, a group of 32 men and boys, 22 Roman Catholic and 10 Anglican, were burned at the stake. Most of them were young pages in Mwanga’s household, from their head-man, Charles Lwanga, to the thirteen-year-old Kizito, who went to his death “laughing and chattering.” These and many other Ugandan Christians suffered for their faith then and in the next few years.

In 1977, the Anglican Archbishop Janani Luwum and many other Christians suffered death for their faith under the tyrant Idi Amin.

Thanks largely to their common heritage of suffering for their Master, Christians of various communions in Uganda have always been on excellent terms.

 

by James Kiefer